First Input Delay

FID 08 scaled

First Input Delay, often known as FID, is a web performance and user experience measure that monitors the time that elapses between the first time a visitor interacts with a web page and the moment the visitor’s browser begins to analyze that interaction. This phenomenon is referred to as the first input delay.

To explain this concept in layman’s words, the FID is the amount of time that passes between an action taken by the user, such as clicking or tapping on a link or button, and the point at which the browser reacts to that action and begins to process it. So, for example, imagine that you are timing how long it takes for someone to respond when you ring their doorbell and then measuring how long that lasts.

The fact that Google utilizes FID as a ranking factor is the most vital information regarding this metric. It is one of the Core Web Vitals, which are the metrics that Google utilizes to measure the quality of the user experience provided by your website and, as a result, the page rank of that website.

In addition, enhancements to the site’s speed and the user experience almost always result in a rise in conversions, sales, and advertising income. Users may feel frustrated waiting for your website to load if you don’t address their FID. However, you may alleviate this sensation by addressing your FID.

Because it is one of the Real User Indicators and not a lab measure, the First Input Delay is considered one of the fascinating metrics for measuring website performance. It is impossible to replicate the phenomenon in a laboratory setting; instead, it needs the participation of actual users to be evaluated. The authentic experience that real people get when they access your website is what FID measures.

FID only measures finite interactions

It is necessary for the occurrences that qualify as user interactions to be discrete or limited in scope. This implies that it can only be anything with a different starting and end point, such as hitting a button, clicking a link, or choosing a checkbox from a list of options.

Because there is no expected response from the site, continuous types of user interaction like scrolling your web page or zooming cannot be accurately measured using this metric. First Input Delay aims to determine how responsive a website is while loading, so this metric is incompatible with continuous types of user interaction.

Only the first user contact is taken into account for calculating FID.

When a person interacts with your website for the first time, that experience is their first impression, and first impressions are crucial. How users feel and perceive the performance of your website is determined by this.

Because essential resources load at the beginning of a page’s lifetime, this phase of the page’s lifecycle causes most of the browser’s main thread to get blocked.

First Input Delay is different from time to interactive.

Another helpful online speed statistic is Time to Interactive (TTI), often confused with First Input Delay.

The time it takes for a page to become completely interactive is what the TTI metric measures. A page is considered fully interactive when it has generated usable content, user interactions are handled within 50 milliseconds, and event handlers are registered for the majority of page components.

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